Category Archives: Monthly To Do List

Sultry August in Your Desert Potted Garden

 The ‘OMG’ Month in Your Desert Potted Garden

It’s hot. It’s humid. Ugh. You don’t need me to tell you that. August is the month to take a break from many desert potted garden chores. The largest challenges are managing the weather and the needs of your garden.

You have the list here. Right click on it and print it out. Here are a few extra tips.

Hmmm… that’s funny – Tips!

Pot with top-heavy Bougainvillea is a high danger of blowing over.

i.e., Tipping pots

Heavy rains with blustery winds can endanger tall pots with narrow bases. When a storm is coming, be sure to

  • lasso them in
  • tuck them into corners or
  • put other, more solid structures around them.

 

 


Tip #2

Irrigation and Watering Your Pots During the Rains

Do not assume because it rains that you can stop watering your pots. Here’s some information from various weather sources:

  • Don’t forget to water your plants, even when it rains. … Even in wet seasons, watering helps, because roots need air to function, and a “cats and dogs” rain temporarily drives all the air out of the ground.

A ‘cats and dogs’ rain certainly applies to monsoon rains.

  • An inch of water should penetrate the ground at least 6 to 15 inches, depending on the soil type. Clay soils are denser, and water doesn’t penetrate as deeply as in sandy soils. Ideal garden soil will be moist 12 inches after an inch of rain.

I can hear you now – oh good! The local weather said we had an inch of rain! Did you have an inch where you live? Do you have a rain gauge near your pots? Or better yet, in one of your pots? Often we get a 1/4′ which is absolutely not enough for your summer flowers.

  • Soil on the dry side will take longer to absorb enough water to rehydrate itself. So that inch of rain is not going to do enough good to allow you to skip a day.
  • And speaking of skipping a day, if it rains that inch or more today, don’t assume it is good for tomorrow. Thirsty summer flowers usually need water daily so don’t skip. Check the soil. If it remains cloudy, you may not need to water on Day Two.

Don’t assume. Check your plants daily or you may be in for a very sad surprise.

Tip #3

Plant new plants in your desert potted garden only if you find good ones

Sometimes in August, the supply of new flowers is disappointing. If you have some plants in your pots that are looking really sad, pull them out and groom the bare soil spots.

Visit your favorite nursery and look for thriving Pentas, Summer Snaps (Angelonia), or healthy young petunias. If you don’t see something you really like, Wait! Talk to the staff and see when they think some fresh plants will be in. You want things that will be gorgeous throughout the fall.

If you have a copy of my book, check out the section on shoulder season plants. If not, click on the image to order one today!

Happy Monsooning! …. Marylee

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It’s a hot one – Desert Pots Care – July

July Container Garden Care in Dry Climates

Are we going to get a break? I don’t see any sign of monsoons now. Maybe as this reaches you, the weather will prove me wrong!

Pay attention to your desert pots and watering system; irrigation or human. 😉

 

Put this Checklist on your refrigerator so you do not forget your desert pots!

 


Get a Deal on Scheduling an In-Home Consultation with Marylee!


Reserve Now – Have your appointment when it cools off.

A design for 8 pots rather than 5

Two seasons of Designs rather than 1

Reserve Your Space Now before Prices Go Up

Delay your Appointment until September **

Secure your spot today as appointments are limited! Email Now! 


Get the help you need fast and easily right from your smartphone or tablet.  

Choose an area of your outdoors that has been a challenge for you. This area typically will be a covered patio, an entry, a section of your yard or a corner behind a pool. It is an area where you feel that pots will improve the look and give your home the added beauty you are looking for.  

Included in your consultation: 

  • A one-hour live session with Marylee through your phone’s lens. (Facetime or Skype – I can help you if you are unfamiliar with using these video tools) 

  • Immediate answers to pressing problems or challenges 

  • Recommendations for relocating and/or adding pots in your most challenging area.  

Following your consultation, Marylee will email the following within a week of your appointment: 

  • A simple drawing of the planned area with included pots numbered for easy reference 

  • Two custom designed planting plans for up to five Eight pots* 

  • A list of materials needed including optional materials that make your gardening experience more efficient and enjoyable 

  • A step-by-step action plan to guide you in completing your project 

  • An after-planting care guide to ensure your new plants get off to a good start.   

Price all inclusive – $125** for up to five eight pots.  

Marylee will give you an estimate for additional pot or planter designs. 

Next Step? 

Email Marylee to book your appointment today! Within a day or two, you will be sent a questionnaire to complete with the link to book an appointment. Your appointment will be billed at time of scheduling. 

**Offer expires September 1, 2018. Appointments must be booked before October 1, 2018.


I hope you stay in touch with me!

Feel free to send me your questions.

Happy Potting!

Marylee

Stay Tuned as I send out other tips this month for your summer pots. Receive your copy of Marylee’s Monthly Potted Garden News in your inbox by signing up below.

 

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As the Desert Heats Up – Care for Your Hot Pots

May Container Garden Care for Hot Pots in Dry Climates

The keyword this month is Mindfulness. It’s imperative to stay in touch with your garden. Monitor all plants as the Desert heats up, especially your newly planted gardens in the hot pots.
Also pay attention to your watering system; irrigation or human. 😉

I hope you stay in touch with me!

Feel free to send me your questions.

Put this Checklist on your refrigerator so you do not forget!

Happy Potting!

Marylee


Coming Up Next!

Stay Tuned as I send out other tips this month for your summer pots. Receive your copy of Marylee’s Monthly Potted Garden News in your inbox One Week from Today by signing up below.

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Hold Off Planting Summer Flowers in Desert Pots

Do your March Diligence before Planting Summer Flowers


3 Reasons to Hold Off Planting Summer Flowers

1.Frosted Perennials Remind Gardeners to Wait Until April to Plant Summer Flowers

The nights are still too cold to plant summer flowers.  You think just because I live on Kauai I don’t know what’s going on in the dry and hot regions of the country? This week in desert communities, nights are predicted to be in the 40’s plus or minus 5 degrees depending on your elevation. Summer annuals need a strong start to survive – no Thrive all summer long. They need time to grow their root system before the heat begins.

2.Beautiful Pinks Still Grace Three Pots of Winter Plantings

Your winter flower should still be looking lovely and scented annuals are filling the air with their fragrances. I am picturing the fragrance of Allysum with Stock mixed in with Jasmines and Citrus flowers. A good pruning or dead heading will help you get them to satisfy you for another few weeks. Give them a shot of fertilizer too (water soluble) to be sure they are well fed.

3. Rich Blue Pot with Yellow Winter Annuals in Desert Full Sun

The nurseries may have a few early summer flowers tempting your wallet. But they are typically young plants, not always well rooted. You will have a much better selection if you want 4 – 5 more weeks. Also, landscapers will be buying out the first round of plants from local growers and nurseries. Let them have first dibs and wait for the second round as the nights warm up.

Coming Up Next!

Your personal copy of Marylee’s Monthly Potted Garden News can be in your inbox One Week from Today! 

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Still Time to Get Potted for the Holidays!

Potted – in your container gardens that is!

Last Minute Ideas for your pots

Plant annuals under or around your potted permanent plants.
  • Go to the nursery and choose flowers that go with your holiday color scheme.
  • Choose from the list below or get help from your local nursery staff
  • Plant these plants right into the soil, adding a little time release fertilizer (scant handful)
  • Water in after planting.
For your Sun Plantings, add Red and White Annuals such as:
  • Petunias
  • Stock
  • Million Bells
  • Dianthus – try the newer variety of Amazon or other super tall Dianthus
  • Nemesia
  • Diaiscia
  • Geraniums (part shade too)
  • Snapdragons (Whites and Burgundy – no red)
  • Pansies and Viola (Whites and Burgundy – no red)

Shade Plantings – Red and White Annuals:
  • Primrose and Cyclamen are your best bets in full shade.
  • Geraniums best in morning or filtered sun
  • Poinsettias are of course wonderful and with all the new varieties, you have more choices than only red.
  • Paper Whites, and Amaryllis are great nursery plants that you can use in pots during the holidays.
  • If there is a dip in temperatures to 40° or below, you will want to bring tender tropical plants inside.

If you only have a little time

Simply place a potted plant (or several) on top of the soil of the larger plant and dress it with potted ivy, garland, pine boughs, lights and anything else you have on hand to finish it off. This is a great way to use those tender nursery plants that you might have to bring inside.
Pots on your patio or near your front door are a great place to add candles (maybe the flameless variety) inside chimneys among the plantings. This would be a great addition when you are expecting guests.
No matter how much or how little you do, allow your child’s eye the freedom to create the look you want for the holidays. I know I have kept within the traditional red and white color spectrum but if you want to work with blues, all whites, gold’s or silver’s – look to those colors when you visit the nursery. I know you will find something that just tickles you.

Read More…

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4 Tips to a Stunning Winter Container Garden

 Are your winter desert gardens giving you a showcase?

As the desert moves into the second half of winter, your pots should be starting to really show off. In spite of the cold temperatures over the holidays, February’s potential warming will spur your seasonal annuals to bloom beautifully for you!

You may have heard me say this before  New desert gardeners often say, “You can’t have flowers in the winter!” I always felt that statement was from their experience back home in cold winter country. I would also discover that they were trying to grow annuals that are not our winter flowers.

By the way, if you are looking for lists of flowers that do work in the harsh desert climate, check out my book, Getting Potted in the Desert.

Follow these tips to have a gorgeous riot of color the rest of the winter.

  1. Cover your pots when there are forecasts for below freezing temperatures. You need to know your micro climates around your home. If you are in a cold pocket, you will need to cover even when the forecast is above 32.
  2. Not sure of your temps? Pick up a digital thermometer with a readout memory at your local hardware store.
  3. Be sure that the soil of ornamentals is damp before going into a freeze. Do not water succulents however.
  4. Cover the plants/pots with frost cloth or blankets. Do not use towels or other materials that will become laden with water if it rains. Certainly, do not use plastic.
  5. Remove cloths after temps rise above 40.
  6. Fertilize your potted flowers and ornamentals every two weeks with a water soluble fertilizer dissolved in water. Spray both the plants and the soil with the nutrient rich mixture. Water with this deeply.
  7. Deadhead spent flowers all the way back to the originating stem regularly.
  8. Be sure your pots have enough water but are not saturated continually. Soil drying rates depend on:
    • The size of your pots
    • How much sun they receive
    • Day and night temperatures
    • Shade provided by the plants themselves keeping the soil cooler
    • Windy days

You might need to monitor this on a regular basis. But if your pots are doing well with an abundance of flowers, just keep doing what you are doing.

Have realistic expectations. You need to be using the best plants and flowers for your climate and conditions.

  1. Don’t expect plants like Vinca and Tomatoes to survive a cold winter.
  2. Snapdragons and Petunias will stop blooming when it is really chilly.
  3. Annuals considered to be hot climate winter performers may still freeze succumbing to the cold. Lobelia and Geraniums will be the first to go.

Take some time to devise the methods you need for your garden to become the envy of your neighbors.

 

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Don’t neglect your hot garden now

Desert Red Geraniums and Silver.potteddesert.comDid that headline make you feel guilty? I know it’s been/is hot, and humid in many areas and for some, monsoons have brought major rains. Who wants to go outside to do more than the absolutely necessary tasks?

Set out to accomplish these few manageable jobs and you will prepare your container garden to become a beautiful fall showcase as the nights begin to cool off. Trust me – I’ve been there.

To Do In Your Pots This Month

Pre-Fall Tasks to Complete in the Next Couple Weeks

  1. Water pots deeply if not getting ample rainfall.

  2. Use a water soluble fertilizer every two weeks.

  3. Pull all dead plants.

  4. Towards the end of the month, cut back overgrown plants to new growth.

  5. Check your geraniums to see if there is new growth. If so, cut back any dead wood to that point. Don’t overwater them but give a loud cheer!

  6. Plan on planting some late season annuals when there is consistent afternoon cloud cover or nights get into the 70’s AND when the nurseries have suitable flowers.

 

Look for flowers from my shoulder season flower list in my book. “Getting Potted in the Desert"

If you don’t have a copy, order one today and have it before it is time to plan your fall and winter desert container garden.Cover Web final

Print and Kindle Editions available on Amazon.


Chalkboard pix.website banner

I will be continuing to present my container garden classes at the Tucson Botanical Gardens – via WEBCAST.

Sign up just like you do for any classes and go to the Gardens. I will be live via the big screen!

Upcoming Schedule: Click on the link to go to the description page (be patient – loading can be a little slow.)

All classes are 1:00-2:30 pm AZ time

Thursday, Oct 20: A Flourishing Potted Garden – the 101 of Container Gardening in the Desert

Thursday, Oct. 27: Great Winter Potted Gardens

Thursday, Nov. 10: A Flourishing Potted Garden – the 101 of Container Gardening in the Desert

Thursday, Dec. 1: Container Gardens for the Holidays


Cover-Web-final

 

Order your copy of Getting Potted in the Desert Today!

Receive additional in-depth updates – FREE and special prices on new products and servicesI hope you stay in touch with me!

by Marylee, The Desert’s Potted Garden Expert!

 

 

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July in your Hot, Dry Container Garden

Think Positively – You Can Grow Beautiful Pots even in the hot summer

Summer Potted Desert Flowers

Want more tips in your email box? Sign up for free updates and receive your own copy of Top Tips to Successful Desert Pots.

To Do In Your Pots This Month

1. Garden and water in the very early mornings.

Who wants to be out in the heat?

2. Increase watering frequency to be sure pots don’t dry out.

You want your pots to be damp throughout.

3. Deadhead your spent flowers weekly to encourage new buds

Doing this weekly makes it be less of a chore.

4. Avoid pruning plants now that the desert has heated up.

Pruning now leads to sunburn by exposing previously shaded stems.

5. Keep up with bi-weekly pot fertilizing with a water-soluble fertilizer.

Be sure the soil is already damp before applying fertilizer.

 

Special notes on roses (From the Rose Society of Tucson)Healthy rose blooms (2)

Water, water, water: 

  • As temperatures remain above 100 degrees, water potted roses daily.
  • New potted roses may need water twice a day
  • NEW RECOMMENDATION: Water late in the afternoon after 6 p.m. during this time of year which allows for less evaporation
  • Place potted roses in an area that gets afternoon shade

Spray off your roses daily with water: The No.1 enemy of roses during the summer in hot and dry climates are spider mites. Spider mites, which look like small salt-and-pepper particles under leaves, will suck the leaves dry until they turn light brown and fall off. Keeping as much foliage on your plants is crucial to rose health during the summer.Every morning, spray off your roses with a jet of water supplied by a nozzle  attached to your water hose. YMake sure you spray underneath the leaves of the plant. By doing this daily, this will prevent spider mites from getting started. The added benefit is adding humidity to your garden which is vital in arid summer conditions.

Do not deadhead or remove dead leaves during the heat. Every bit of added shade helps.

 

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Potted Desert Garden Care in February


How do you remember our winter so far this year? Rainy, chilly, downright cold?

Do not let a warm week in February allow you to think that winter is over. We can and most likely will have freezing temperatures this month and possible into March. Average last frost date is March 15 and remember – That is the AVERAGE!!! I just read that Chad Borseth from Native Seed Search and Facebook Group Tucson Backyard Gardening posted that he bases the last freeze being over by when his Mesquite tree blooms. Great tip from one of Tucson’s experts.

 


Potted Garden Tips for February:

frost

 

Frosted or Frozen Plant Damage

  • Do not be tempted to prune back frost damaged plants yet.
  • We need to wait until the danger of frost is over (average date March 15)
  • Watch for a surprise frost and cover tender annuals.

 

Mitchell 10-03-11 (11)Fertilize your citrus around Valentine’s Day 

  1. Water both the day before and immediately after applying granular fertilizers.
  2. Use a granular fertilizer according to the directions on the package. Size and age of the trees determine how much fertilizer you use.
  3. Fertilize mature trees away the trunk, meaning the outer two thirds of the ground of the leaf canopy where the most active roots are.
  4. Give the trees a deep soaking watering after applying the fertilizer.
  5. Newly planted trees do not need fertilizer the first 1-2 years after planting).
  6. Note: Whether you use Ammonium Sulfate, Ammonium Phosphate or Citrus Food fertilizer it’s important to read instructions because the amount of fertilizer need per year will vary depending on the age, size, and type of citrus tree. For example, a medium-sized adult tree 5-6 years after planting needs 6.2 pounds of Ammonium Sulfate per year (split into three applications). Grapefruit trees 5 or more years after planting need half the amount for other citrus.
    Source: Pima County Master Gardener Program
  7. Continue to pick your citrus. You do not need to harvest all of the fruit just because the trees come into flower. Grapefruit and Valencia oranges will continue to sweeten while left on the trees.

Potted Plants

  1. Continue your bi-weekly fertilizing routine.
  2. Deadhead regularly and prune to shape plants.
  3. Blast your plants with a jet spray from about 4 feet away to deter pests and disease.
  4. Water potted cactus and succulents if you have not gotten ample rain. If you have registered an inch of rain in the last month, that is enough for now.

Roses (from the Rose Society of Tucson)

  1. Complete all pruning of your roses by mid-February.
  2. Once you’re done pruning, be sure to clean up all the old mulch and dead leaves and throw them in the trash, not your compost pile. Dead leaves can often have mildew spores and other diseases on them that can infest your compost pile and create problems later on.
  3. Apply both a pesticide and a fungicide to your pruned roses and the soil in the pots. Fungus spores such as mildew can live through the winter in your soil.
  4. Apply long-term or organic fertilizer, such as Max Magic Mix, Bandini Rose Food or homemade com-post. Also, it helps to add superphosphate at this time and apply a half cup of Epsom salts. Scratch it into the soil and water in.
  5. Two weeks following the long-term fertilizing, begin your regular short-term or liquid fertilizing program using a water soluble fertilizer such as Rapid Gro or Miracle Gro.
  6. Once growth appears, start in on your hose jet-spray regime to keep the aphids and mildew away.
  7. Continue to water your roses. As daytime temperatures increase, increase your watering frequency making sure the pot drains with each watering.

Have a beautiful month! February and March are our spring months and we want to get out and enjoy our splendid winter gardens!

~ Marylee Briehl 10-4-13 (3)

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December in your Desert Potted Garden

December Chalk boardGreetings All! Happy December!

As I sat down to write this month’s post, as often happens after Thanksgiving, I was a little uninspired. There are many things I rather be doing than gardening this month or even writing about gardening. When I get to this point of the year, I am often ready to take a break and just enjoy my garden, tending it a little and then getting on with the holidays! So I thought – that is OK! I am human, am I not? I can tell my gardening friends like it is and I would not be surprised if you don’t tell me you are feeling it too!

I have spent a lot of time this fall getting the word out on my book, Getting Potted in the Desert. It has been a blast and I cannot tell you how thrilled I am with the response I have received. I know it was a long time coming and I kept promising those in my classes that some day this information would be available in print/published form. I keep placing more orders for copies and will keep doing so until we get all desert dwellers potted!! I plan to get it on Amazon and in an e-book form after the holidays.

It’s not to late to order books now – for yourself or for a gift.

I am also planning many more workshops and book events the first half of 2016 – Check out the upcoming events page here on the website or if you are reading this via the blog, over to the right.

Here is a quote from one of our book purchasers:

I moved to Tucson a year and a half ago from the Seattle, Washington area. I needed to “re-learn” and adjust to many new gardening techniques in this Sonoran Desert climate. Marylee’s new book is a godsend. I now have a “to do” list for every month with the information I need to take care of my landscape and pots … as well as add new plants or dispose of ones I don’t want any longer. Thank You Marylee!  Kathy P.

Desert Red Geraniums and Silver.potteddesert.comIf you are so inclined to do some planting this month:

You might want to pick up some extra flowers to make your pots company ready. Or add an arrangement to your front door. Whatever whim you have, keep it simple and save your time and energy for other holiday preparations and definitely time to enjoy your friends and family.

Happy Holidays to you!

Keep everyone you love close – if not in person, than in your hearts.

Take time for each other and to smell the flowers!

imageMarylee

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Getting Potted In
The De
sert Book

Marylee Pangman shares her wealth of information gained from 20 + years creating successful Potted Gardens in the Desert