Tag Archives: dry garden

Ahhh – October in your Potted Desert Garden

Hanging Baskets, Pots and Beds Create a Living Dividerin a Desert Potted Garden

If you have not realized it by now, I love potted desert gardens. They are so versatile in there uses, flexible in their placement and plantings and the bottom line – you don’t have to dig in the ground!!… Marylee Pangman, Potted Desert Expert

Stay on top of your garden tasks to keep your potted desert garden thriving 365 days a year with October’s list!

October's Potted Desert Garden Checklist


Don’t Build Walls – Create outdoor ‘rooms’ with potted desert gardens

Many patios are like bowling alleys. Many yards have no delineated areas. Some homeowners will build ramadas, patios, gazeboes and outdoor kitchens. All of these add to the hardscape of your property and in our desert homes – the HEAT!! 

I came to the realization years ago that you can create magic out of these scenarios with pots.  

The Walkway to a Secluded Side Yard Patio at a Desert Home

In my first Tucson home, we had a long walkway down the side of the house to the backyard. Not wanting to waste any space and shaded by the neighbor’s oleanders, we created sitting areas down this path and separated it with a trellis (made out of concrete reinforcing metal screening) and pots with vines (including a Tombstone Rose, Jasmine, and Tangerine Beauty CrossVine) that grew up the angled trellis.

Large Planters create a barrier at a Tucson restaurant patio

One of my restaurant client’s patio faced a parking lot. We created side by side concrete planters filled with Robelini Palms and Mexican Lime trees, underplanted with cascading flowers and herbs – to be used by the chef. 

Eding a Driveway with more than a railing

Red Geraniums accompanied by grey Dusty Miller and Red Yucca make this an easy care driveway screen

Above is a cool idea of a roundabout driveway that has a drop off if you don’t make the corner! The contractor put up a standard double railing to warn the drivers, but it looked pretty industrial. The planters are 48” wireframe hayracks with coco-fiber liners. Then we welded on decorative braces to assist in the planters’ stability. 

So you see, there are a myriad of ways you can use pots to serve as a function in your home. They allow you to work with a smaller budget and to have tremendous flexibility as we gardeners change our minds – as we tend to do.  🙂

Happy Potting!

Marylee


 Before you go shopping for your winter flowers,

Follow this Link

 

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Sultry August in Your Desert Potted Garden

 The ‘OMG’ Month in Your Desert Potted Garden

It’s hot. It’s humid. Ugh. You don’t need me to tell you that. August is the month to take a break from many desert potted garden chores. The largest challenges are managing the weather and the needs of your garden.

You have the list here. Right click on it and print it out. Here are a few extra tips.

Hmmm… that’s funny – Tips!

Pot with top-heavy Bougainvillea is a high danger of blowing over.

i.e., Tipping pots

Heavy rains with blustery winds can endanger tall pots with narrow bases. When a storm is coming, be sure to

  • lasso them in
  • tuck them into corners or
  • put other, more solid structures around them.

 

 


Tip #2

Irrigation and Watering Your Pots During the Rains

Do not assume because it rains that you can stop watering your pots. Here’s some information from various weather sources:

  • Don’t forget to water your plants, even when it rains. … Even in wet seasons, watering helps, because roots need air to function, and a “cats and dogs” rain temporarily drives all the air out of the ground.

A ‘cats and dogs’ rain certainly applies to monsoon rains.

  • An inch of water should penetrate the ground at least 6 to 15 inches, depending on the soil type. Clay soils are denser, and water doesn’t penetrate as deeply as in sandy soils. Ideal garden soil will be moist 12 inches after an inch of rain.

I can hear you now – oh good! The local weather said we had an inch of rain! Did you have an inch where you live? Do you have a rain gauge near your pots? Or better yet, in one of your pots? Often we get a 1/4′ which is absolutely not enough for your summer flowers.

  • Soil on the dry side will take longer to absorb enough water to rehydrate itself. So that inch of rain is not going to do enough good to allow you to skip a day.
  • And speaking of skipping a day, if it rains that inch or more today, don’t assume it is good for tomorrow. Thirsty summer flowers usually need water daily so don’t skip. Check the soil. If it remains cloudy, you may not need to water on Day Two.

Don’t assume. Check your plants daily or you may be in for a very sad surprise.

Tip #3

Plant new plants in your desert potted garden only if you find good ones

Sometimes in August, the supply of new flowers is disappointing. If you have some plants in your pots that are looking really sad, pull them out and groom the bare soil spots.

Visit your favorite nursery and look for thriving Pentas, Summer Snaps (Angelonia), or healthy young petunias. If you don’t see something you really like, Wait! Talk to the staff and see when they think some fresh plants will be in. You want things that will be gorgeous throughout the fall.

If you have a copy of my book, check out the section on shoulder season plants. If not, click on the image to order one today!

Happy Monsooning! …. Marylee

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Still Time to Get Potted for the Holidays!

Potted – in your container gardens that is!

Last Minute Ideas for your pots

Plant annuals under or around your potted permanent plants.
  • Go to the nursery and choose flowers that go with your holiday color scheme.
  • Choose from the list below or get help from your local nursery staff
  • Plant these plants right into the soil, adding a little time release fertilizer (scant handful)
  • Water in after planting.
For your Sun Plantings, add Red and White Annuals such as:
  • Petunias
  • Stock
  • Million Bells
  • Dianthus – try the newer variety of Amazon or other super tall Dianthus
  • Nemesia
  • Diaiscia
  • Geraniums (part shade too)
  • Snapdragons (Whites and Burgundy – no red)
  • Pansies and Viola (Whites and Burgundy – no red)

Shade Plantings – Red and White Annuals:
  • Primrose and Cyclamen are your best bets in full shade.
  • Geraniums best in morning or filtered sun
  • Poinsettias are of course wonderful and with all the new varieties, you have more choices than only red.
  • Paper Whites, and Amaryllis are great nursery plants that you can use in pots during the holidays.
  • If there is a dip in temperatures to 40° or below, you will want to bring tender tropical plants inside.

If you only have a little time

Simply place a potted plant (or several) on top of the soil of the larger plant and dress it with potted ivy, garland, pine boughs, lights and anything else you have on hand to finish it off. This is a great way to use those tender nursery plants that you might have to bring inside.
Pots on your patio or near your front door are a great place to add candles (maybe the flameless variety) inside chimneys among the plantings. This would be a great addition when you are expecting guests.
No matter how much or how little you do, allow your child’s eye the freedom to create the look you want for the holidays. I know I have kept within the traditional red and white color spectrum but if you want to work with blues, all whites, gold’s or silver’s – look to those colors when you visit the nursery. I know you will find something that just tickles you.

Read More…

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Don’t neglect your hot garden now

Desert Red Geraniums and Silver.potteddesert.comDid that headline make you feel guilty? I know it’s been/is hot, and humid in many areas and for some, monsoons have brought major rains. Who wants to go outside to do more than the absolutely necessary tasks?

Set out to accomplish these few manageable jobs and you will prepare your container garden to become a beautiful fall showcase as the nights begin to cool off. Trust me – I’ve been there.

To Do In Your Pots This Month

Pre-Fall Tasks to Complete in the Next Couple Weeks

  1. Water pots deeply if not getting ample rainfall.

  2. Use a water soluble fertilizer every two weeks.

  3. Pull all dead plants.

  4. Towards the end of the month, cut back overgrown plants to new growth.

  5. Check your geraniums to see if there is new growth. If so, cut back any dead wood to that point. Don’t overwater them but give a loud cheer!

  6. Plan on planting some late season annuals when there is consistent afternoon cloud cover or nights get into the 70’s AND when the nurseries have suitable flowers.

 

Look for flowers from my shoulder season flower list in my book. “Getting Potted in the Desert"

If you don’t have a copy, order one today and have it before it is time to plan your fall and winter desert container garden.Cover Web final

Print and Kindle Editions available on Amazon.


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I will be continuing to present my container garden classes at the Tucson Botanical Gardens – via WEBCAST.

Sign up just like you do for any classes and go to the Gardens. I will be live via the big screen!

Upcoming Schedule: Click on the link to go to the description page (be patient – loading can be a little slow.)

All classes are 1:00-2:30 pm AZ time

Thursday, Oct 20: A Flourishing Potted Garden – the 101 of Container Gardening in the Desert

Thursday, Oct. 27: Great Winter Potted Gardens

Thursday, Nov. 10: A Flourishing Potted Garden – the 101 of Container Gardening in the Desert

Thursday, Dec. 1: Container Gardens for the Holidays


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Order your copy of Getting Potted in the Desert Today!

Receive additional in-depth updates – FREE and special prices on new products and servicesI hope you stay in touch with me!

by Marylee, The Desert’s Potted Garden Expert!

 

 

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3 Conditions Where Hand Watering Your Hot Container Garden is the Right Choice

You decide to do a couple pots. You know we need the soil and pots and plants. As our excitement about our project escalates, do we think about how to water them once they are in place?
In many climates, water is not often an issue. In cities like Seattle where there are 340 days of rain, potted gardens only need occasional supplemental water. However, as our climates continue to change with more and more areas experiencing drought conditions, we do need to consider how we are going to get the water to our containers.
You might be thinking to just use a watering can or a hose or possibly your existing or new irrigation system. Now I am not going to get into irrigating your pots in this post. That is a much larger subject than I am willing to tackle today. But I will leave you with the knowledge that 90% of the time when using irrigation, you need a dedicated valve and line to water pots correctly.
You might also have recently seen olla’s or glass balls that distribute water as the soil dries. I don’t have much personal experience with these. Having lived in the middle desert for 20 years I am somewhat leery of possible solutions where I cannot be sure that the water or moisture will be distributed throughout the full body of soil. I understand that this method is based on old ways of ‘the early days’ of gardening for food.
Let’s move back to the original topic of when it is best to hand water.
Potted Desert Potted SucculentsCacti and Succulents
When you are potting up cactus and other succulents, hand watering is definitely the way to go. The frequency of water needed depends on the specific plant, the size of the pot and the amount of sun it receives every day. A basic guide is to water cacti and succulents monthly during the cooler seasons and bi-weekly in hot months. It is best to err on too little water, not over-watering.
Fountain Grass
Ornamental Plants
For ornamental shrubs, trees, vegetables, herbs and flowers, I recommend hose watering rather than using a bucket or watering can. A hose with a good nozzle can provide a rain shower that is not only gentle in its application but thorough in distributing water to the entire soil bed.
 
Hand watering recommended for Container Gardens
Preventative Care
A hose nozzle also provides a jet spray which will improve plant health when used daily during hot spells to aerate the plant and send off any pests that are lurking in the cool shade of the leaves. The mist setting on the nozzle will provide cooling respite for hot afternoons when the soil itself has not dried out enough to need to water.
Watch for next Friday’s blog where I will talk about placing your pots to make watering easier.

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July in your Hot, Dry Container Garden

Think Positively – You Can Grow Beautiful Pots even in the hot summer

Summer Potted Desert Flowers

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To Do In Your Pots This Month

1. Garden and water in the very early mornings.

Who wants to be out in the heat?

2. Increase watering frequency to be sure pots don’t dry out.

You want your pots to be damp throughout.

3. Deadhead your spent flowers weekly to encourage new buds

Doing this weekly makes it be less of a chore.

4. Avoid pruning plants now that the desert has heated up.

Pruning now leads to sunburn by exposing previously shaded stems.

5. Keep up with bi-weekly pot fertilizing with a water-soluble fertilizer.

Be sure the soil is already damp before applying fertilizer.

 

Special notes on roses (From the Rose Society of Tucson)Healthy rose blooms (2)

Water, water, water: 

  • As temperatures remain above 100 degrees, water potted roses daily.
  • New potted roses may need water twice a day
  • NEW RECOMMENDATION: Water late in the afternoon after 6 p.m. during this time of year which allows for less evaporation
  • Place potted roses in an area that gets afternoon shade

Spray off your roses daily with water: The No.1 enemy of roses during the summer in hot and dry climates are spider mites. Spider mites, which look like small salt-and-pepper particles under leaves, will suck the leaves dry until they turn light brown and fall off. Keeping as much foliage on your plants is crucial to rose health during the summer.Every morning, spray off your roses with a jet of water supplied by a nozzle  attached to your water hose. YMake sure you spray underneath the leaves of the plant. By doing this daily, this will prevent spider mites from getting started. The added benefit is adding humidity to your garden which is vital in arid summer conditions.

Do not deadhead or remove dead leaves during the heat. Every bit of added shade helps.

 

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Getting Potted In
The De
sert Book

Marylee Pangman shares her wealth of information gained from 20 + years creating successful Potted Gardens in the Desert