Tag Archives: Marylee Pangman

Save Money with these 6 Tips for your Container Gardening Shopping

Do you have a plan before you go flower shopping for your pots?

Marylee choosing flowers for her container gardens

  1. Know your pots. (Sizes, color and sun/shade)
  2. Know your desired color scheme
  3. Grab a cart at the nursery and an empty flat or carton.
  4. Place your selections on the flat and then step back and look at it.
  5. Stare at it hard and long and be sure it sits right with you.
  6. If something seems just not right, take out one plant. Look at color combinations, textures, and heights. Often you have too many small flowered plants with small leaves and that can complicate the arrangement.

A 24” pot with one central planting will need approximately fourteen (14) “4” inch” plants. If you select any gallon plants, they can replace 3-4 smaller ones. I urge you to use 4” plants and not six-packs. (Ask me why!)

Important: When you go shopping and bring your plants home, water them in well and plant as soon as possible – as in the same day. If you have to wait until the next morning, place them in the shade to rest until the morning.


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Don’t neglect your hot garden now

Desert Red Geraniums and Silver.potteddesert.comDid that headline make you feel guilty? I know it’s been/is hot, and humid in many areas and for some, monsoons have brought major rains. Who wants to go outside to do more than the absolutely necessary tasks?

Set out to accomplish these few manageable jobs and you will prepare your container garden to become a beautiful fall showcase as the nights begin to cool off. Trust me – I’ve been there.

To Do In Your Pots This Month

Pre-Fall Tasks to Complete in the Next Couple Weeks

  1. Water pots deeply if not getting ample rainfall.

  2. Use a water soluble fertilizer every two weeks.

  3. Pull all dead plants.

  4. Towards the end of the month, cut back overgrown plants to new growth.

  5. Check your geraniums to see if there is new growth. If so, cut back any dead wood to that point. Don’t overwater them but give a loud cheer!

  6. Plan on planting some late season annuals when there is consistent afternoon cloud cover or nights get into the 70’s AND when the nurseries have suitable flowers.

 

Look for flowers from my shoulder season flower list in my book. “Getting Potted in the Desert"

If you don’t have a copy, order one today and have it before it is time to plan your fall and winter desert container garden.Cover Web final

Print and Kindle Editions available on Amazon.


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I will be continuing to present my container garden classes at the Tucson Botanical Gardens – via WEBCAST.

Sign up just like you do for any classes and go to the Gardens. I will be live via the big screen!

Upcoming Schedule: Click on the link to go to the description page (be patient – loading can be a little slow.)

All classes are 1:00-2:30 pm AZ time

Thursday, Oct 20: A Flourishing Potted Garden – the 101 of Container Gardening in the Desert

Thursday, Oct. 27: Great Winter Potted Gardens

Thursday, Nov. 10: A Flourishing Potted Garden – the 101 of Container Gardening in the Desert

Thursday, Dec. 1: Container Gardens for the Holidays


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Order your copy of Getting Potted in the Desert Today!

Receive additional in-depth updates – FREE and special prices on new products and servicesI hope you stay in touch with me!

by Marylee, The Desert’s Potted Garden Expert!

 

 

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3 Conditions Where Hand Watering Your Hot Container Garden is the Right Choice

You decide to do a couple pots. You know we need the soil and pots and plants. As our excitement about our project escalates, do we think about how to water them once they are in place?
In many climates, water is not often an issue. In cities like Seattle where there are 340 days of rain, potted gardens only need occasional supplemental water. However, as our climates continue to change with more and more areas experiencing drought conditions, we do need to consider how we are going to get the water to our containers.
You might be thinking to just use a watering can or a hose or possibly your existing or new irrigation system. Now I am not going to get into irrigating your pots in this post. That is a much larger subject than I am willing to tackle today. But I will leave you with the knowledge that 90% of the time when using irrigation, you need a dedicated valve and line to water pots correctly.
You might also have recently seen olla’s or glass balls that distribute water as the soil dries. I don’t have much personal experience with these. Having lived in the middle desert for 20 years I am somewhat leery of possible solutions where I cannot be sure that the water or moisture will be distributed throughout the full body of soil. I understand that this method is based on old ways of ‘the early days’ of gardening for food.
Let’s move back to the original topic of when it is best to hand water.
Potted Desert Potted SucculentsCacti and Succulents
When you are potting up cactus and other succulents, hand watering is definitely the way to go. The frequency of water needed depends on the specific plant, the size of the pot and the amount of sun it receives every day. A basic guide is to water cacti and succulents monthly during the cooler seasons and bi-weekly in hot months. It is best to err on too little water, not over-watering.
Fountain Grass
Ornamental Plants
For ornamental shrubs, trees, vegetables, herbs and flowers, I recommend hose watering rather than using a bucket or watering can. A hose with a good nozzle can provide a rain shower that is not only gentle in its application but thorough in distributing water to the entire soil bed.
 
Hand watering recommended for Container Gardens
Preventative Care
A hose nozzle also provides a jet spray which will improve plant health when used daily during hot spells to aerate the plant and send off any pests that are lurking in the cool shade of the leaves. The mist setting on the nozzle will provide cooling respite for hot afternoons when the soil itself has not dried out enough to need to water.
Watch for next Friday’s blog where I will talk about placing your pots to make watering easier.

 Like this tip? Pick up your Free tips to container gardening success by clicking below.

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Potted Desert Garden Care in February


How do you remember our winter so far this year? Rainy, chilly, downright cold?

Do not let a warm week in February allow you to think that winter is over. We can and most likely will have freezing temperatures this month and possible into March. Average last frost date is March 15 and remember – That is the AVERAGE!!! I just read that Chad Borseth from Native Seed Search and Facebook Group Tucson Backyard Gardening posted that he bases the last freeze being over by when his Mesquite tree blooms. Great tip from one of Tucson’s experts.

 


Potted Garden Tips for February:

frost

 

Frosted or Frozen Plant Damage

  • Do not be tempted to prune back frost damaged plants yet.
  • We need to wait until the danger of frost is over (average date March 15)
  • Watch for a surprise frost and cover tender annuals.

 

Mitchell 10-03-11 (11)Fertilize your citrus around Valentine’s Day 

  1. Water both the day before and immediately after applying granular fertilizers.
  2. Use a granular fertilizer according to the directions on the package. Size and age of the trees determine how much fertilizer you use.
  3. Fertilize mature trees away the trunk, meaning the outer two thirds of the ground of the leaf canopy where the most active roots are.
  4. Give the trees a deep soaking watering after applying the fertilizer.
  5. Newly planted trees do not need fertilizer the first 1-2 years after planting).
  6. Note: Whether you use Ammonium Sulfate, Ammonium Phosphate or Citrus Food fertilizer it’s important to read instructions because the amount of fertilizer need per year will vary depending on the age, size, and type of citrus tree. For example, a medium-sized adult tree 5-6 years after planting needs 6.2 pounds of Ammonium Sulfate per year (split into three applications). Grapefruit trees 5 or more years after planting need half the amount for other citrus.
    Source: Pima County Master Gardener Program
  7. Continue to pick your citrus. You do not need to harvest all of the fruit just because the trees come into flower. Grapefruit and Valencia oranges will continue to sweeten while left on the trees.

Potted Plants

  1. Continue your bi-weekly fertilizing routine.
  2. Deadhead regularly and prune to shape plants.
  3. Blast your plants with a jet spray from about 4 feet away to deter pests and disease.
  4. Water potted cactus and succulents if you have not gotten ample rain. If you have registered an inch of rain in the last month, that is enough for now.

Roses (from the Rose Society of Tucson)

  1. Complete all pruning of your roses by mid-February.
  2. Once you’re done pruning, be sure to clean up all the old mulch and dead leaves and throw them in the trash, not your compost pile. Dead leaves can often have mildew spores and other diseases on them that can infest your compost pile and create problems later on.
  3. Apply both a pesticide and a fungicide to your pruned roses and the soil in the pots. Fungus spores such as mildew can live through the winter in your soil.
  4. Apply long-term or organic fertilizer, such as Max Magic Mix, Bandini Rose Food or homemade com-post. Also, it helps to add superphosphate at this time and apply a half cup of Epsom salts. Scratch it into the soil and water in.
  5. Two weeks following the long-term fertilizing, begin your regular short-term or liquid fertilizing program using a water soluble fertilizer such as Rapid Gro or Miracle Gro.
  6. Once growth appears, start in on your hose jet-spray regime to keep the aphids and mildew away.
  7. Continue to water your roses. As daytime temperatures increase, increase your watering frequency making sure the pot drains with each watering.

Have a beautiful month! February and March are our spring months and we want to get out and enjoy our splendid winter gardens!

~ Marylee Briehl 10-4-13 (3)

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Getting Potted In
The De
sert Book

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Marylee Pangman shares her wealth of information gained from 20 + years creating successful Potted Gardens in the Desert

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